What Digby said

Strengthen local, volunteer-powered community radio by making a tax-deductible donation. kboo.fm/give

november_29_2022.png

Once again, here's Digby, doing it better than most could even hope.

Really, read it. She is one of the best bloggers around.

-A

Topic tags: 

Comments

What kind of car should George W Bush drive?

Answer: an electric (of course), but one with lithium-ion batteries in the hope that some of the lithium would work its way into George's cranium and have a tranquilizing affect. :^)

And another thing:

The current state-of-the-art automotive battery, the Ni-mh, were installed in Toyota Rav-4, the GM's EV-1 (not hybrids), and were lasting over 100,000 miles of use. In other words, this battery is ready to go NOW, and we shoudn't have to wait for Lithium-ion which are as yet unperfected for use in cars.

Lithium-ion weigh less than Ni-mh, but the weight should be considered an advantage rather than a drawback. The battery weight can lower center-of-gravity to improve stability and handling, a perfect safety feature especially applicable to top-heavy roll-prone SUVs and any car.

You know what's funny? Chevron Corp owns the patents to automotive Ni-mh battery technology.

All things being equal, I'd rather it was some other company besides Chevron that owns the patent on the Ni-mh battery. But if they're willing to bring it to market on a large scale, I say go for it.

The problem of course is that Chevron likely acquired the patent with the intention of NEVER bring the batteries to market.

Word. I thought she handled the ridiculous Clinton supporters well who still to this day, won't deal with the obvious race-baiting Hil pulled in MI and PA. The McTeleprompter campaign pulled this outta her playbook, with the idiotic "race card" bullshit.

Agreed. We didn't talk too much on the show about Clinton's race-baiting during the latter stages of the campaign, but I thought it was disappointing. It was a shame that such a pioneering campaign, and candidate, resorted to what amounted to the politics of desperation.