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Stage and Studio

Host/Producer Dmae Roberts.  Aired Live from the KBOO studio.

Each week Dmae Roberts talks with performing, literary and media artists from the Portland Metro area as well as around the Northwest.  As a two-time Peabody award-winning radio producer and writer, Roberts brings national quality to regional arts scene. Dmae often features her national radio work on Stage and Studio.If you have an event please send an email to stagenstudio@aol.com two months before your event.   The earlier the better!

 Also join the SNS Facebook page. 

And check out the official Stage and Studio website.

 

 

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Episode Archive

Dámaso Rodriguez, artistic director of Artists Repertory Theatre

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Dámaso Rodriguez, artistic director of Artists Repertory Theatre

Dmae Roberts checks in with Dámaso Rodriguez, artistic director of Artists Repertory Theatre. After a season of plays that didn't differ too much from the Artists Rep's past seasons, Rodriguez opened the most diverse season in the company's history starting with Lynn Nottage's Intimate Apparel and Carlos Lacámara's Exiles.

From Tonga To Tonkin

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 09/23/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
From Tonga To Tonkin
Dmae Roberts presents a two-part Stage & Studio focusing on the songs and stories of Tongan sewing circle in Portland as well as a play celebrating the heroic stand of Senator Wayne Morse, one of two congressman to vote against the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution.

First, Dmae gives us a feature on Portland's Tongan community through the stories Kato Kakala Kavapalu and Kolini Fusitua for the Migrations project  focusing on little known immigrant and refugee arts in the Portland area. We'll hear about the Pacific Islander Sewing Circle, a group of women who get together to sew and sing in beautiful harmonies as they work. Learn how this one group is the hub for hundreds of Tongan families in the Northwest.  

The Piano Lesson

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 09/16/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
August Wilson's "The Piano Lesson"
Dmae Roberts talks with director Kevin Jones and actor Chantal DeGroat about August Wilson's The Piano Lesson about to open at Portland Playhouse.  Tune in for an insightful talk about this sixth production of Wilson's American Century Cycle that opens the 7th season of Portland Playhouse. ​We'll hear about the play as well the August Wilson Red Door Project, an organization with a mission to change the racial ecology of Portland that Jones co-founded and now runs as artistic director.

Comedian Hari Kondabolu

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 09/09/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Comedian Hari Kondabolu Awaits the Year 2042
Comedian Hari Kondabolu is coming back to Portland September 26-27! The New York-based comic has been featured on Conan O'Brien, David Letterman, and was a writer for "Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell." Known for his political style of humor, he recently released his first album, "Waiting for 2042", the year when white people will be the statistical minority in the United States. 

He joins guest host Sarika Mehta for a live phone interview on Stage & Studio to talk about his adventures in comedy and his album "Waiting for 2042". 

Merci-Murder

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 09/02/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Sans Merci & Murder On The Ganges

In business, the word "diversify" means to become more diverse or enlarge a field of operation. Portland's performance scene still has a ways to go in representing diverse races and cultures that live here. Two companies--one in theatre and the other in dance--are run by leaders committed to diversifying the landscape in performance through their productions. We talk with Antonio Sonera of Badass Theatre Company who's directing Sans Merci and Anita Menon of the Anjali School of Dance who's creating Murder On The Ganges.

Unit Souzou

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 08/26/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Unit Souzou Presents Saisei - New Beginnings
Artists have their fair share of doors closing on them. But it's how you open new doors that helps define your strength as an artist. Michelle Fujii was artistic director of Portland Taiko for nine years. Toru Watanabe, her husband, had an artistic staff position for six years. Suddenly this summer, the PT board decided to restructure the organization, and they eliminated Fujii's position. Watanabe made the decision to leave with her.

Simon Tam and The Slants

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 08/19/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Simon Tam
Guest Host Sarika Mehta interviews Simon Tam is the bassist of Portland's very own Chinatown dance rock band, The Slants. The band is beloved worldwide and has even gained recognition from younger audiences, survivors of Japanese internment camps and everyone in between! However, they are in the middle of a five-year lawsuit with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

The band is made up of all Asian American members, yet the US Patent & Trademark Office claims their rejection on the basis of the band's name being racist. 

Stories From Home

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 08/12/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Stories From Home
Dmae Roberts talks with Polo Catalani of the Colored Pencils Art and Culture Council about "Stories From Home" event featuring immigrant and refugee writers and musicians. We'll be featuring two of the artists at the event-- Palestinian American writer Mohammad Bader and Bhutanese poet Moti Rizal. This is a special feature of "Migrations" - Dmae's series focusing on immigrant and refugee artists. 

Featured music: Parfait Bassale at ParfaitOnline.com.

Moh Alileche

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 08/05/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Moh Alileche -Algerian Berber Music
Dmae Roberts talks with Moh Alileche, master of Algerian Berber music. Berbers are an indigenous ethnicity  of Northern Africa. The culture dates back more than 5000 years.  Alileche came to the U.S. in 1990  shortly before the civil war in Algeria started. And now he performs Berber music while educating people about his former homeland and the culture. He'll be performing live, and we'll also hear tracks from his latest CD. 

Mei Mei

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 07/29/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Mei Mei, A Daughter's Song by Dmae Roberts
Dmae Roberts presents her 1989 Peabody award-winning documentary"Mei Mei, A Daughter's Song" This memoir docu-theatre piece is the personal story of cross-cultural and cross-generational conflict produced by Dmae Roberts.

Audio

Backstage with Triangle & Open Studio with Heather Soderberg

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 09/13/2011

Dmae Roberts presents two audio tours. First we go backstage at Triangle Productions's new space. Managing Director Don Horn shows us around "The Sanctuary" and tells us how he produces a season of plays. Then we go to Cascade Locks, OR and talk with sculptor Heather Soderberg and find out how she creates large-sized statues. Finally Dmae has thoughts about the loss of summer.

Don Horn has been producing plays for Triangle Productions for more than 20 years. The plays he chooses have often been shocking, risque, entertaining and englightening. The plays often appeal to gay and straight audiences alike. Dmae talked with Horn as he was getting ready to start a new season which include Maybe Baby, It's You (read review), The Big Bang, The Irish Curse and the original play he's writingGracie, about a famed Portlander Gracie Hansen who ran a burlesque show at the Hoyt Hotel in the 1970s. Dmae talked with Horn and got a backstage tour of his new space, The Sanctuary.

In the second part of the show, Dmae dropped by the studio of Heather Soderberg in Cascade Locks, OR. Soderberg is known for her life-size sculptures. Her most well-known work is that of Sacagawea, the famed Native American heroine and guide to Lewis and Clark.

Soderberg has been creating scuptures since she was two years old when her father gave her some soft wax. She instantly sculpted impressive figures and became a child prodigy. Father and daughter often still work together on occasion. In 2009, Soderberg became the only woman to own a bronze foundry in the U.S.

And finally Dmae presents a personal essay about loss and the end of summer.

You can hear Stage & Studio  live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at  Radio23.org.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

And always browse our archive of shows at the official Stage and Studio website.

Denis Arndt, veteran actor/director

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 09/06/2011

On Tues, Sept. 6 at 11 a.m. on KBOO 90.7 FM, Dmae Roberts talks with actor and director Denis Arndt, veteran of major American theatres including the Oregon Shakespeare Festival as well as hit television shows acting roles since then. Now Arndt has been directing and his latest project is ART's "God of Carnage" a play he's performed in the past.

Denis Arndt & Bill Geisslinger ART's "Seafarer

Bob Hicks in his blog Artscatter said of Arndt: "What’s always struck me about Arndt’s performances is how meticulously thought out yet precipitously on the edge they are. He takes you to the tipping point."

Arndt has performed in major theaters across the country and in Canada, including New York’s Public Theatre and Chicago’s Goodman Theatre as well as Kansas City Rep, Houston's Alley Theatre, Washington DC's Arena Stage and Studio Theatre. Arndt performed in 15 seasons at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival performing title roles in King Lear, Titus Andronicus, Coriolanus; Iago in Othello, Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, Proteus in Two Gents. He was seen as James in Moon for the Misbegotten opposite Jean Smart and Jamie in Long Day's Journey Into Night with William Hurt who played Edmund. Film and television roles include LA Law, Picket Fences, The Practice, Boston Legal, Providence, Colombo, Murder She Wrote, Basic Instinct, Metro, Supernatural, 24, Swat, and others.

Artists Repertory Theatre presents the Tony-award-winning play God of Carnage by Yasmina Rez a and directed by Denis Arndt, stage, television and film actor. This shocking comedy/ drama play kicks off ART’s 29th season with actors Patrick Dizney, Michael Mendelson, Trisha Miller, Allison Tigard.

Performance Dates are September 6 – October 9 at ART’s Alder Stage (16th and Alder St.) in Portland. For tickets call 503.241.1278 or visit www.artistsrep.org.

You can hear Stage & Studio live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays

.And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at Radio23.org. Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

And always browse our archive of shows at the official Stage and Studio website

Street Books + Social Practice Art

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 08/30/2011

Host Dmae Roberts presents a collage story on Laura Moulton's Street Books produced by Tali Singer. Later, she revisits socially engaging art with Jen Delos Reyes & Harrell Fletcher of the Art amd  Social Practice program at Portland State University. Producer Macon Reed gives us a  tour of Portland's social practice art scene. Social practice is a non-traditional art form that's all about engaging the public. But it's more than just street theatre. Social practice art can use just about any medium, as long as it's interactive and gives people a chance to be a part of the art. 

One artist who embodies those principles is Laura Moulton. This summer, she created Street Books, which she describes as a "bicycle-powered mobile library for people living outside." Producer Tali Singer spent a coule weeks recording sounds and interviews of Street Books in action. Learn more at the Street Books website, where Moulton posts regular updates on her patrons. You can also make a donation, or keep up with the latest Street Book news.
Harrell Fletcher, Macon Reed, Jen Delos Reyes

 

Social practice art has been around for a couple of decades, but it has recently experienced a huge surge on the West Coast, especially in San Francisco where a social practice program was established at California College of the Arts. Portland also has an  art and social practice MFA program of its own at Portland State University, established in 2007. We'll hear from Jen Delos Reyes and Harrell Fletcher, both professors for the program.

Throughout the show, producer Macon Reed will bring us the sounds of social practice. We'll hear from singing food vendors and social practice students. And we'll learn about the Portland Stock Dinner, a unique way Portland artists are getting funded.

Featured music composed by Todd Barton, resident composer for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Find out more about his music at ToddBarton.com.

Tali Singer has worked as an intern with Dmae Roberts since 2008. She's now a senior at Brandeis University where she's majoring in linguistics. After graduating, she plans to pursue a career in public radio.

Tali Singer and Jason Breedlove

This edition of Stage & Studio is Pushing Boundaries special made possible with funding from the Regional Arts & Culture Council.Pushing Boundaries is a year-long series that explores artists and arts groups pushing physical, emotional and artistic boundaries in their work.

You can hear Stage & Studio  live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

And always browse our archive of shows at the official Stage and Studio website

 

S. Renee Mitchell and Remembering Carolyn

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 08/16/2011

On this week's Stage & Studio writer/artist S. Renee Mitchell talks about the Natural and Proud People Inspiration project, a celebration of natural African-American hair. Mitchell also runs Twysted Healing Systahs, an organization that empowers women of color. And Dmae remembers Carolyn Holzman, a beloved Portland theatre artist and teacher.

S. Renee Mitchell wears her hair in beautiful, twisted strands. But it wasn't always that way. She used to spend lots of time and money straightening her hair to conform to white ideas of beauty. She's long since ditched the chemicals and has devoted a career to empowering people of color and inspiring self-pride. In her newest project, Mitchell is trying to spark a conversation about our attitudes about hair and beauty. Mitchell conducted workshops at barber shops and beauty salons and created poetry that she'll read live on Stage & Studio.

It's all part of the Natural and Proud People Inspiration Project. The NAPPI Project explores the relationships between African-Americans and their hair. Through facilitated dialogue, social networking, and art, Mitchell is getting at bigger questions of self-esteem, marginalization, and who determines what is beauty and attractiveness.

As part of the 4th annual Peace & Unity Fest, Mitchell presents "Natural Hair, Natural Living" on Saturday, August 27th at 1:30 pm, at Curious Comedy, 5225 NE MLK Jr Blvd.

Later in the show, Dmae Roberts has a remembrance of beloved artist and teacher Carolyn Holzman. You can read Dmae's article about Holzman here. In her work as a director and choreographer for Portland stages and as an adjunct Professor in the theatre arts department at Portland State University, Carolyn touched many lives and was a vibrant member of Portland's artistic community.

You can hear Stage & Studio live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at Radio23.org

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

Eugenia Woods' Famished & Kip Fulbeck's Hapa Art

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 08/02/2011

On Stage & Studio, Aug. 2nd at 11 am on KBOO 90.7fm, Dmae Roberts talks with Eugenia Woods about her documentary theatre piece about food called Famished. Then we hear from artist Kip Fulbeck. He's exploring mixed-race heritage with an exhibit titled Kip Fulbeck: Part Asian, 100% Hapa.

What are you really hungry for? That's the question playwright Eugenia Woods asks in Famished, her interactive theatrical documentary. Famished explores how we relate to food, from the simple pleasures of food to the rituals and traditions behind it. Based on dozens of interviews, and evolving through audience participation,Famished covers a wide range of experiences of eating and sharing food, including food cravings and cooking for seduction.

Famished is being presented in three Portland events:

1st) as an theatrical improvisation,Wednesday, August 10, 7 pm at D-Street Noshery,3221 SE Division St.

2nd) as a community potluck August 19th at 6pm at Portland Playhouse, 602 NE Prescott Street.

3rd) and in a staged reading on Sunday, August 21st at 7 pm at the Portland Playhouse. For more information and to get tickets, check out the Famished website. The world premiere is coming in 2012.

In the latter part of the show, artist Kip Fulbeck focuses on the question, "What are you?" The award-winning photographer is the creator of an exhibit called "Part-Asian, 100% Hapa" showing at the Oregon Nikkei Center. The exhibit features Fulbeck's portraits of "Hapa". Used to refer to people whose mixed-race heritage includes Asian or Pacific Rim ancestry, "Hapa" comes from Hawai'ian word for "half". Once considered a derogatory term, many have now taken ownership of "Hapa" with pride.

"Part-Asian, 100% Hapa" isshowing at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center through the end of this year. Come to the center on August 4th for a special lecture by Emily Momohara, Laura Kina, and Dmae Roberts.

Kip Fulbeck, artist, spoken word performer, and filmmaker,  has been featured on CNN, MTV and PBS. His books include Mixed: Portraits of Multiracial Kids and Part Asian, 100% Hapa.

You can hear Stage & Studio  live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at  Radio23.org.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

Pushing Beyond Boundaries: Michelle Fujii and Catherine J.H. Miller

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 07/26/2011

On this week's Stage & Studio we hear two artists pushing boundaries of traditions and limitations. Dmae Roberts profiles musician/dancer Michelle Fujii and her new solo performance, Choking. And Producer Tali Singer presents a NEW story on Catherine J.H. Miller, who created "A Somewhat Secret Place: Disability and Art." This is a Pushing Boundaries special funded by the Regional Arts and Culture Council.

First up, Dmae Roberts presents a feature story on Michelle Fujii. She's a fourth generation Japanese-American and the artistic director of Portland Taiko, as well as a Japanese folk dancer, composer, and choreographer. Fujii is using all of those talents to push the boundaries of Japanese tradition with her solo show Choking.

The show tells the story both of Fujii's artistic journey and of her family history through a blending of the ancient and the modern--a mixture of taiko, dance, and video. Fujii also created a gallery installation that theatre-goers can check out before the show. The installation explores Fujii's Japanese-American identity, and the experience of her parents and grandparents being incarcerated during World War II. Click here to learn more about the performance, including ticket info and showtimes.

Next, Producer Tali Singer present a NEW piece about artist Catherine J.H. Miller, creator of an exhibition called "A Somewhat Secret Place: Disabilty and Art." Miller is a young artist who is legally blind, but she's been creating art her whole life. We hear about how Miller went from a doodling toddler to a graduate of the Pacific Northwest College of Art. And we visit the multidisciplinary  exhibition on disability arts pride at PRESENTspace gallery.

A Somewhat Secret Place is about far more than the gallery, though. With this project, Miller is pushing the boundaries of how we think of limitations. And she's opening a conversation that join the worlds of disability pride and fine art. The exhibition runs through the end of July. Learn more at their website.

You can hear Stage & Studio  live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at  Radio23.org.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

And always browse our archive of shows at the official Stage and Studio website.

Pushing Boundaries

is a year-long project that explores artists and arts groups pushing physical, emotional and artistic boundaries in their work and it’s made possible with funding by the 

Regional Arts and Culture Council.

Encore Edition: Author Jane Kirkpatrick

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 07/19/2011

In this special encore edition of Stage & Studio, host/Producer Dmae Roberts talks with Oregon author Jane Kirkpatrick. She's authored more than 20 books and is an Oregon Book award finalist for "A Flickering Light." Her latest is "The Daughter's Walk" which is based on the true story of a mother and daughter in 1896 who both walked from Spokane, Washington to New York City  to save the family farm.

Kirkpatrick talks about the research and process of writing an historic novel and reads an excerpt from her book. She lives in Central Oregon and considers herself a writer inspired by the landscape. She tells us about how she approached the real life events in "The Daughter's Walk" to focus on Clara Etsby who journeyed with her mother on the 3600-mile trek only to come to a 20-year estrangement from her family. The young woman goes on to become a successful business woman and carves out an earl feminist path for herself.

Dmae talked with Kirkpatrick at Warner Pacific College before she spoke at the Women's Tea. To find out where you might hear her read visit her website.

Exerpt from "The Daughter's Walk" by Jane Kirkpatrick:

"It began on an April morning in 1896, inside our Mica Creek farmhouse in the rolling Palouse Hills of eastern Washington State, when my mother informed me that we would be walking from Spokane to New York City. Walking, mind you, when there were perfectly good trains a person could take. Walking—nearly four thousand miles to earn ten thousand dollars that would save our farm from foreclosure. Also to prove that a woman had stamina.

Also to wear the new reform dress and show the freedom such garments offered busy,active, sturdy women.

Freedom. The only merit I saw in the shorter skirts and absence of corsets was that we could run faster from people chasing us for being foolish enough to embark on such a trek across the country, two women, alone.

We were also making this journey to keep me “from making a terrible mistake,” Mama told me. I was nineteen years old and able to make my own decisions, or so I thought. But not this one.

Mama stood stiff as a wagon tongue, her back to my father and me, drinking a cup of coffee that steamed the window. I could see my brother Olaf outside, moving the sheep to another field with the help of Sailor, our dog, dots of white like swirling cotton fluffs bounding over an ocean of green. Such a bucolic scene about to reveal hidden rocks beneath it.

“We are going to walk to New York City, Clara, you and I.”

You can hear Stage & Studio  live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at  Radio23.org.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

And always browse our archive of shows at the official Stage and Studio website

 

Big Animation with Rose Bond and DripDrop

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 07/12/2011

Dmae Roberts talks with veteran media artist Rose Bond about her work on large-scale animations and her teaching of Boundary Crossings' an institute on animated. Also featured is Daniela Repas of DripDrop Productions. They're debuting Pre-Nostalgic, DripDrop’s new animated installation of sound, sculpture, and drawing. DripDrop tells us about the installation, which has been two years in the making.

Rose Bond is an award-winning artist whose work straddles the lines between animation, art and architecture. She has created several large-scale, site-specific installations, as well as a number of films. Her work challenges people to think about how they perceive time, space, and memory. Bond is an associate professor at the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Contemporary Animated Art.

DripDrop is a multi-media trio made up of Thornton C. Wilson, Todd Tawd, and Daniela Repas. Their newest large-scale multi-media installation, Pre-Nostalgic, runs July 22-25 at 230 E Burnside. It combines sound, sculpture, and animation to create an emotionally charged narrative.

Listen to Stage & Studio to learn more about Rose Bond, Boundary Crossings, DripDrop, and Pre-Nostalgic. Hear how animation and installation art are intersecting and changing both worlds!

You can hear Stage & Studio live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at Radio23.org.

Or you can visit the official Stage and Studio website.

A Somewhat Secret Place

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 07/05/2011

 Host Dmae Roberts presents a feature story by Tali Singer about  'A Somewhat Secret Place' an exhibition of art, literature and performance curated and created by artist Catherine J. H. Miller. This is Pushing Boundaries show about the intersection between fine art and disability pride art.

Producer Tali Singer worked with Dmae Roberts to bring this profile of Miller and her project that combines art and awareness to create disability pride art in Portland.

Catherine J.H. Miller

Miller who is legally blind has broken barriers to her work as an artist and now she hopes to inspire conversations about disability culture and the fine art world. This show is part of our Pushing Boundaries series.

'A Somewhat Secret Place' Exhibition is presented the entire month of July at PRESENTspace located 939 NW Glisan, PDX, 97209 (Enter on 10th Avenue.) Hours  M-Sat 11am - 5pm.

Find more info at: 'A Somewhat Secret Place' blog.

The show opens July 7th with First Thursday and the grand opening is July 9th starting with a writing workshop by Write Around Portland.

Pushing Boundaries is a year-long project that explores artists and arts groups pushing physical, emotional and artistic boundaries in their work and it's made possible with funding by the Regional Arts and Culture Council.

Also featured is poet A. Molotkov with another Writers Read contribution from his CD of sound poetry "Can You Stay Forever?"

A. Molotkov

A. Molotkov is a writer, composer, filmmaker and visual artist.  Born in St. Petersburg, he moved to the U.S. in 1990 and switched to writing in English in 1993.  He is the author of several novels, short story and poetry collections and the winner of the 2011 Boone’s Dock Press poetry chapbook contest for his upcoming “True Stories from the Future”.   His credits also include the 2010 New Millennium Writings and 2008 E. M. Koeppel Fiction Awards, and a Pushcart nomination.  Molotkov’s work has appeared in over 50 publications, both in print and online.  Visit him at www.AMolotkov.com.

You can hear Stage & Studio  live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at  Radio23.org.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

And always browse our archive of shows at the official Stage and Studio website.

Author Lisa See on 'Dreams of Joy'

program: 
Stage and Studio
program date: 
Tue, 06/28/2011

 Dmae Roberts talks with acclaimed author Lisa See. Her latest novel, Dreams of Joy debuted  at No. 1 on the NY Times best seller list. See tells us about her extensive research on Mao's Great Leap Forward that caused the death of up 45 million people  in China from 1958-1961. We also hear about the movie version of See's book Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, to be released in July 2011.

Dreams of Joy is a sequel to See's earlier novel, Shanghai Girls. The book follows the title character, 19-year-old Joy, and her mother Pearl in Communist China during a horrific time: the euphemistically-named Great Leap Forward.

As in all of her novels, See brings the stories to life with details gleaned from her intensive eresearch. But Dreams of Joy also deals with the universal theme of the relationship between mother and daughter. As one Chinese aphorism goes, "Mothers suffer. Childen do what they want."

Lisa See
Lisa See as a girl

 

Lisa See grew up in Los Angeles, the great-granddaughter of a patriarch of Los Angeles Chinatown, Fong See. Although she lived with her mother, who is not Chinese, she also spent a lot of time with her father's Chinese American family. These experiences of being in between two cultures laid the groundwork for her writing later on.

Lisa See on the Great Leap Forward

Lisa See interview excerpt: "The Great Leap Forward starts in 1958. It was a new country. I think they did want to bring China up into the 20th century. They wanted to become what they actually have become: a global economic superpower. But this was their way of trying to get there. And they had these campaigns where sometimes it would seem like a good idea at the beginning, but they didn’t really think through the consequences. […]   If you put a frog in hot water and you slowly turn it up, it doesn’t have the sense to jump out because it’s not really noticing until it’s too late. I think that’s part of what is happening here."

Listen to Stage & Studio to hear more about the Great Leap Forward, including how the policies led to overpopulation, mass starvation, and the death of millions of Chinese.

Read a short excerpt from Dreams of Joy from the point of view of Pearl, Joy's mother:

Lisa See reading: " As a girl, I dreamed of my wedding. The dress, the veil, the banquet, the gifts. And none of it turned out the way I imagined. As a mother, I’ve dreamed of my daughter’s wedding. A ceremony in the Methodist church in Chinatown attended by all of our friends, Joy’s dress, my dress, the flowers, the reception at Su Qiao restaurant. But this is nothing like that either. Joy is right that there isn’t supposed to be any kind of ceremony or celebration, but as a stranger and someone who has some money to spend, I can bend the rules. Brigade leader Lai is more than happy to take a bribe, some of my special overseas Chinese certificates worth less than 20 dollars, so I can give my daughter a wedding that pays homage to the past and is still true to the new China." 

Listen to Stage & Studio to hear Lisa See read a longer passage!

See was also featured in Dmae Roberts "In The Mix" documentary about Mixed Race artists.

You can hear Stage & Studio  live at the KBOO.FM or on 90.7FM live at 11am Tuesdays.

And tune into re-broadcasts of Stage & Studio at Portland's Cascade Community Radio at  Radio23.org.

Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes so you don’t have to miss a show.

And always browse our archive of shows at the official Stage and Studio website.

 

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